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How to be a Perfect Host

What does it take to be a perfect host?

Let’s start with being hospitable.

Then, create an environment that is easy to be in, comfortable, and inviting. Anticipate your guest’s wants and needs. Be generous with food and drink. Respect shared spaces. Make a good and welcoming entrance to your space. Most important…be friendly.

Ok, now that we have established that.

Let’s speak to hosting a perfect environment when it comes to wellness.

I often wonder why some folks get that nasty cold and cough that puts them down for weeks. Then, they start feeling better, and boom, another relapse. Then, there are those that get a bit of a sniffle and they are up and running the next day. Then, there are those that don’t get sick. They seem to have a steady tone when it comes to wellness. Even when others in their households have fallen ill with a contagious virus, cold, or the flu they picked up somewhere. These folks just kinda keep on keeping on.

These people are terrible hosts by creating an inhospitable internal environment. They don’t create a rich soup for viruses and bacteria to bloom in.

What is a perfect environment when hosting illness?

First, a gut rich in residues, sugars, and mucus. That is the ideal place to start a colony of parasites, creating a bacterial playground and blooming viruses. Hello, irritated bowel and colon problems, along with the inability to absorb nutrients, so feeling tired and out of sorts all add to this mix. 

Many will go to the doctor to get a 7-day round of antibiotics. Which will slow down the bloom many times. You might suspect the bacteria and viruses go dormant when confronted with an antibiotic, nesting deep in the rich mucus bed until your immune system has a creak due to bodily or mental stress…then, wham…they bloom again.

Second, consider when blood is thick with phlegm and undigested foods, agglutinated cells. (Scary to see a few drops of blood under a dark field microscope.) Also one of the base causes of inflammation and a breeding ground for blood-borne viruses, parasites, and bacteria.

Third, consider the lymphatic system, our internal plumbing system that flushes out toxins from the bloodstream. The lymph system runs in tiny tubes, has gathering glands called nodes, and is filled with a viscose liquid called lymph. All sorts of things can go haywire when one is exposed to chemicals in personal products, environmental contaminants, food additives, etc. 

Remember, the lymphatic system has no pump attached to invigorate the movement of lymph. It becomes simulated by muscle movement. That’s why exercise, swimming, walking, yoga, dance, and all that movement are essential to feeling good and pain-free.

How to be a Perfect Host

If you feel like it, try a couple of weeks of:

  • Drinking plenty of water with lime juice in the morning
  • Keep your internal ph. in the green zone. Remember, cells will slowly stop growing in an acid Petri dish. Normal ph should be in the 7 neutral zone
  • Avoid sugar, all sugars
  • Avoid sticky stuff like wheat, potatoes, milk products and aged cheeses
  • Add in wholesome proteins and fats. Like free-range meats, eggs, avocados
  • Add in veggies, berries, goat cheeses, ghee, olive oil for salads, avocado oil for cooking

And activate the lymph system by getting enough exercise every day to break a sweat.

Be a terrible host:

First off, your immune system is your welcoming entrance. If you have a strong and perky immune system, that nasty bug, bacterial, or virus will not make it in.

If that unwanted guest gets past your first door? Then, one must turn to the internal environment.

Sugar, wheat, pasteurized sugary milk products, and processed foods, among other factors, can create a rich environment for bacteria and viruses to bloom.

Author

  • Krystal Frost

    Krystal earned a degree in Asian Medicine from the University of Guadalajara, then Bastyr University for an acupuncture specialty, and has served our community since 2004. She has written a health column for the Mirror for over 20 years. Many thanks to my readers over two decades!

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